Book Review: Roar by Cecelia Ahern

I’m not going to lie, I love a good parable. One of my favorite books is The Alchemist. I’ve sent the book to many a friend who was on their own person journey. Upon reflection, I don’t remember the last parable I’ve read. It’s funny that’s I’ve read two this year.

My love of parables led me to a TERRIBLE one earlier this year. It was a story about a woman, written by a man, who was spending her life away on lattes. Spoiler alert: the lattes are not the reason women are financially behind. It’s the males like the moron who wrote the book who make it difficult for women to get ahead.

Which brings us to the delightful collection of stories by Cecelia Ahern. Roar is the collection of parables you didn’t know you needed to read. Ahern writes short stories about women who have been smothered in one way or another and their quest to break through. 

Ahern tells thirty unique stories that fit seamlessly together or could stand on their own. At 273 pages, it’s the length of a typical novel but you feel like you are getting so much more because of the diversity of the stories. A couple of my favorites were “The Women Who Thought the Grass Was Greener on the Other Side” and “The Woman Who Wore Pink”. This will be the new book I will be mailing my friends. 

September 2019 Book Dump

September swung between freezing in the morning to sweltering in the afternoon. It didn’t’ really matter how you dressed but you would have dressed incorrectly. With that being said, I was able to take full advantage of those sweltering afternoons and spent a significant amount of time reading in the park.

The books I read in September were:

  1. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
  2. The Other Americans by Lalia Lalami
  3. Roar by Cecelia Ahern

I’m lucky that I was able to get ahead over the summer because otherwise I’d be in some big trouble trying to hit my 50 books goal. As I write this, I’m at 39 books for the year.

Is anyone really behind or really ahead on their reading goals for 2019? Does anyone have any tricks for staying on top of it?

Book Review: The Latte Factor

Farnoosh Torabi is easily one of my favorite podcasters. She is funny and knowledgeable. Her podcast, So Money, airs three times a week. With a high frequency show, she brings on a lot of authors to discuss their new books.

One of her recent guests was David Bach. Bach is a well know financial writer. During his interview, he said that this story has been inside him for 12 years. He knew it had to be a young women and he knew the parable he wanted to tell to the world. He said it would be short and something people can read in an hour. He credited Paulo Coelho with telling him he had to write this book. I added The Latte Factor to my library request list. If Coelho told him to write it, it must be good.

The story follows Zoey Daniels for one week as she decides whether or not she would like to take a new job. She meets a barista who provides her the keys to financial freedom. One of which is getting rid of her daily “double shot latte and muffin” habit. She enacts the advice of the barista and her boss. She ends up staying at her job and being happy. As Bach promised, you can read this story in about an hour.

Sallie Krawcheck had a great reaction to the story. She said “Just buy the f***** latte.”

The Latte Factor has some good points about compound interest and making cuts to things however, I have some of the same issues Sallie does. Why is it a female lead in the story? Bach is a man. Men have plenty of habits that are daily and costly. The latte is a female associated drink. Its an older man giving her the advice. It comes across as mansplaining. Beyond that, the bigger issue with women and earning is that they are paid less than men across the board. We pay more for the same items (the pink tax) as men. There is no paid leave for many women. All of these items have an impact on our financial situation that has nothing to do with the choices we make on how to spend our money.

David Bach wrote a cute story about what can happen if you decide to make some changes to your life. But that’s exactly what it is, a fictional story. Bach wanted to write a parable to teach the millennials when in reality he wrote a condescending short story. The charts he puts in the back are interesting.

Who has read The Latte Factor ? What were your thoughts about the book?

If you want to read Sallie Krawcheck’s response to The Latte Factor  you can read it here.