Book Review: Roar by Cecelia Ahern

I’m not going to lie, I love a good parable. One of my favorite books is The Alchemist. I’ve sent the book to many a friend who was on their own person journey. Upon reflection, I don’t remember the last parable I’ve read. It’s funny that’s I’ve read two this year.

My love of parables led me to a TERRIBLE one earlier this year. It was a story about a woman, written by a man, who was spending her life away on lattes. Spoiler alert: the lattes are not the reason women are financially behind. It’s the males like the moron who wrote the book who make it difficult for women to get ahead.

Which brings us to the delightful collection of stories by Cecelia Ahern. Roar is the collection of parables you didn’t know you needed to read. Ahern writes short stories about women who have been smothered in one way or another and their quest to break through. 

Ahern tells thirty unique stories that fit seamlessly together or could stand on their own. At 273 pages, it’s the length of a typical novel but you feel like you are getting so much more because of the diversity of the stories. A couple of my favorites were “The Women Who Thought the Grass Was Greener on the Other Side” and “The Woman Who Wore Pink”. This will be the new book I will be mailing my friends. 

September 2019 Book Dump

September swung between freezing in the morning to sweltering in the afternoon. It didn’t’ really matter how you dressed but you would have dressed incorrectly. With that being said, I was able to take full advantage of those sweltering afternoons and spent a significant amount of time reading in the park.

The books I read in September were:

  1. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
  2. The Other Americans by Lalia Lalami
  3. Roar by Cecelia Ahern

I’m lucky that I was able to get ahead over the summer because otherwise I’d be in some big trouble trying to hit my 50 books goal. As I write this, I’m at 39 books for the year.

Is anyone really behind or really ahead on their reading goals for 2019? Does anyone have any tricks for staying on top of it?

Where the Crawdads Sing

Per usual, I’m late to the party. I only picked up Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens because it was the Albany Book Club’s October pick.

The novel follows Kya as she navigates life in the swamp. The book opens with five year old Kya watching her mother walk out of the house never to be heard from again and follows her through young adulthood.

Owens tells a beautiful story of isolation and survival in the desolate North Carolina marshlands. She lives outside the world but yearns to be part of it. Against all odds, Kya is able to succeed and survive in her own way.

The reader wants to feel bad for Kya but make no mistake- Kya is a survivor and this story is a victory lap and an ode to the strength of women.

Who has read “Where the Crawdads Sing?” What did you think of the book?