Girls Burn Brighter

I’m reviewing my Goodreads notes on this book, and I have absolutely not idea how it ended up on my list. I’m assuming it was from one of the lists I saw in the last couple of months about upcoming books.

Girls Burn Brighter by Shobhan Rao arrived from the library with about five other books. For once, I asked for the printed receipt and realized that Girls Burn Brighter was a 7 day loan. I rolled my eyes and crumbled up the receipt and tossed it into the trash as I exited the library.

I am perilously close to being unable to borrow more library books due to unpaid library fines. However, in my defense, 7 days and 14 day loans are the culprits! And it’s very difficult to return a book you are halfway through when you KNOW there is a waiting list for the book(which is the reason you are unable to renew it). What is a girl to do?

Moving on, Girls Burn Brighter arrived in a cache of books from the library. I was heading home to my parents house for the holiday weekend and brought a few books with me. I opted to pick up Girls Burn Brighter because of the looming deadline.

This books is many things but the strongest impression that was left on me was the examination of the power of female friendship and the quiet power of women. Poornima and Savitha both had, what can only be described, as a quiet power within themselves.

This book was set in 2001/2002 and I am absolutely horrified to have confirmed that this story is not an outlandish work of fiction. The stories of Poornima and Savitha are not uncommon or unlikely to have happened. The hunger, the poverty, and the violence are all typical and expected experiences for Indian women.

Who else has read this book? I have been talking about this book non stop in the hopes of finding someone to discuss it with. I would love to hear other people’s thoughts on this book.

Happy Reading and Drinking!

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I’m Thinking of Ending Things

I decided to read I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid because it was pitched to be in the same category of Eileen. On the inside flap, it said Reid’s debut novel was reminiscent of We Need To Talk About Kevin. I assumed that this story was simply a story of violence against women.

When I first finished the book, I didn’t know what to think about it. Granted it was the middle of the night and I went from being creeped out to confused. However, I’ve had a couple of days to digest the book and I will say I’m impressed. The story is interesting and the structure of the novel is unique.

Reid does a great job of building fear and anxiety in the reader. What I find so fascinating is that he builds it incrementally in a genuine, believable way. In horror/thrillers, some authors full into the trap of writing shocking scenes or situations just to shock the reader rather than progress the plot line.

In I’m Thinking of Ending Things, the reader slowly feels more upset and anxious without being able to put a finger on what is causing the feelings. I would feel my chest tighten. I was reading this book before bed and every time I would stop to go to bed my mind was spinning with possibilities about what was going on. In the final pages of the novel, you are surprised and flipping back and forth to try and find a sign you missed earlier in the novel.

Great debut. I am interested to see what else Iain Reid has for us in that head of his.